The value of e-books...

Tuesday, April 10, 2012
I was watching the Today show this morning and saw a story where they interviewed Dr. Ian K. Smith about his new book, "The Truth About Men." Dr. Smith was articulate, funny, and I liked what I heard. Any time I hear about a non-fiction book that strikes my interest, especially if it's one I can potentially use as research for my own writing (in this case, for male characters), I grab it. It's not the first time I've bought a book based on seeing it on the Today show.

I literally reached over to my bedside table, grabbed my nook, and bought the book. $11.99 and five minutes later, I was reading it.

And it's a great book.

My point to all those authors out there still stubbornly holding out for a "traditional" book deal with a "traditional" publisher, don't forget the instant gratification factor. He literally sold at least one book (and who knows how many others to people like me) by appearing on the Today show. Before his interview was over, as a matter of fact. If I'd had to wait to buy the book, to go out to a bookstore and get it, or order it to come from a site online as dead-tree book, I probably wouldn't have gotten around to it, if ever. It would have slipped my mind. He most likely would have lost the sale, or at least not had an immediate sale. But because the book was available in e-book format, I grabbed it.

I don't know how much he makes per e-book, but I know I (and other indie-pubbed authors, as well as self-pubbed authors) tend to make MORE per e-book sale than we do print books. We can sell less books and make more money, in other words.

So just a friendly reminder as to why you should never look down your nose at e-books. They can result in sales you might never have had.

3 reader comments:

  1. SusieJ said...:

    Great article and you've probably just made him another sale! (off to check out Amazon UK)
    Hugs xx

  1. My ebook sales definitely outstrip my print sales... and, living as I do in Africa, I really appreciate the instant gratification of being able to read non-mainstream authors I wouldn't have been able to get in print, in a brick-and-mortar store.

  1. Anonymous said...:

    as a reader i do like the convenience of ebooks. it's SO easy just to click the mouse a few times and get my book instead of having to WAIT for a paper book to either be mailed out to me or have to physically go get it.

    the ONLY time i really desire an actual print book is if i loved it SO much i am willing to pay for it